DANIELLE NELSON MOURNING: Homecoming

Danielle Nelson Mourning: Homecoming

May 22 – June 26, 2010

Taylor De Cordoba is proud to present Homecoming, photographs and film by San Francisco-based artist Danielle Nelson Mourning. The exhibition will run from May 22 – June 26, 2010, with an opening reception for the artist on Saturday, May 22 from 6 – 8PM.

For the artist’s solo debut at Taylor De Cordoba, Mourning will exhibit films and strikingly vivid ink jet photographs taken in areas laden with her family history. Traveling between Niagara Falls, New York and Marks, Mississippi the artist staged a series of primarily self-portraits wherein she slips in and out of the homes, attire and settings of her relatives. A desire to surround herself with family lore, which she had only seen in snapshots and heard in oft-repeated stories, motivated her desire to recreate/create this history. The resulting photographs inhabit an eerie space between real and fake. She plays many characters: a 1950s housewife; a1960s wife on the eve of the sexual revolution; and a 1970s liberated woman, with the mood moving from Alfred Hitchcock to John Cassavetes and back again. While at first glance it appears as though the photographs were taken during those past eras, there is something knowing in the artist’s eye, or perhaps her stance, that reminds viewers of the current historical moment.

The work goes deeper in the series of images Mourning staged in Ireland, an interpretation of her Irish ancestry during the potato famine of 1845. Here, she dresses in attire from the day and situates herself in the landscape of her ancestors. This became a psychological experience for the artist, who felt the boundaries between past and personal history eroding.

Alongside the photographs, the gallery will be exhibiting the artist’s intimate 8mm film, made on location in New York and Mississippi. The photographs come to life here, as the viewer recognizes Mourning’s characters moving about perfectly manicured rooms and landscapes. She complements the moving images with a soundtrack of taped conversations with her grandmother. The resulting effect is strange, haunting and timeless.

CHRIS NATROP: myopic spring tangle

Chris Natrop: myopic spring tangle

April 10 – May 15, 2010

Taylor De Cordoba is pleased to present myopic spring tangle, a multi-media installation by Los Angeles-based artist Chris Natrop. The exhibition will open on Saturday April 10 and will remain on view through May 15, 2010. This is the artist’s solo debut at the gallery.

As opposed to Natrop’s previous and more immersive installations, myopic spring tangle is comprised of discrete works of art interrelating as a whole.  While utilizing the existing gallery architecture, the artist employs myriad techniques and uses varied materials to transform the space into a unique environment. In one area, hand-cut pieces of paper painted with watercolor hang from the ceiling in a cluster. Illuminated by small fluorescent tube fixtures with colored gel overlays. This work is “tangled” with colored thread, which travels through the gallery rafters. There are also several framed cut paper pieces, which are the most detailed and precise the artist has completed to date, due in part to powerful reading glasses worn while working. The glasses kept him in a “myopic state,” which allowed him to obsessively subdivide forms to the point at which the physicality of the paper was pushed to it’s structural limit. The exhibit’s final facet is a series of mirrored wall panels, both hyper-detailed and resembling a kaleidoscopic ink blot test. Natrop incorporates other atmospheric details – mirrored Mylar sheet window coverings and a multi-faceted lighting scheme – which highlight the exhibit’s three main components, all connecting to form a free flowing narrative.

For this body of work, Natrop found inspiration in Los Angeles, and specifically it’s river. As it traverses the city, the river is funneled into a narrow concrete channel built for the sole purpose of controlling seasonal flooding. It is a space both forgotten and unseen, filled with elements both natural and manmade. For the artist, it is a place where the essential character of man’s relationship with nature is concentrated and distilled: “Swaths of urban detritus carried by the runoff become ensnared in the tangle of wildlife. Frayed shopping bags, tangled nylon string, shredded clothing, strips of printed-matter festoon the leaf-stripped branches, jetsam flapping in the breeze like Tibetan prayer flags.”

While deliberately ambiguous in it’s narrative, the work aims to reveal a sense of “natural meddling gone awry” while also engaging with the viewer on a psychological level. In the mirrored wall relief, the viewer is faced with their own reflection in a “Rorschach” pattern that their mind seeks to understand, decode and decipher. The use of lighting commonly found in clandestine indoor growing operations adds to the sense of a space that is both natural and artificial, beautiful and unsettling.

KIMBERLY BROOKS: The Stylist Project

Kimberly Brooks: The Stylist Project

February 27 – April 3, 2010

Taylor De Cordoba is pleased to present The Stylist Project, a solo exhibition of new oil paintings by Los Angeles-based artist Kimberly Brooks. The exhibition will run from February 27 – April 3. The gallery will host an opening reception for the artist on Saturday, February 27th from 6pm-8pm.

The Stylist Project is the first in a series of portraits of renowned stylists and fashion industry insiders who have styled themselves and posed for the artist. After delving into deeply personal subject matter for her last two exhibitions – “Momʼs Friends” in 2007 and “Technicolor Summer” in 2008 – Brooks shifts her focus outward with this new body of work. Here, she broaches the red-hot themes of fashion, style and those omnisciently responsible for setting the trends.

This exhibition features portraits of LAʼs most influential style-makers including celebrity stylist Rachel Zoe; costume designer and Madonnaʼs personal stylist Arianne Phillips; New York Times stylist Elizabeth Stewart and Mad Men costume designer Janie Bryant, among others. While many of the stylists are unknown to the general public, this work turns the spotlight on them, raising questions about who is really in charge of what wear and how we choose to present ourselves. Brooksʼ paintings portray a dynamic exchange between two artists: the painter and the stylists — both of whom use various props, settings, lighting, fashion and accessories to set the canvasʼ stage.

Kimberly Brooksʼ work has been featured in numerous juried exhibitions organized by curators from the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Museum of Modern Art. Her work has been featured in the Los Angeles Times, Art Ltd., The Huffington Post, Vanity Fair, Elle, C Magazine among other publications.

For additional information and images, please contact Heather Taylor at 310-559-9156 or heather@taylordecordoba.com. Taylor De Cordoba is located at 2660 South La Cienega Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90034.

THE WOMEN OF WOMEN: THE FEMALE FORM


The Women of Women: The Female Form
curated by Yasmine Mohseni

January 16, 2010 – February 20, 2010

Opening reception: Saturday January 16, 2010 from 6-8PM


Taylor De Cordoba is pleased to present The Women of Women: The Female Form, a group exhibition curated by Yasmine Mohseni. The multi-media exhibition examines women artists depicting the female form. In the history of art, the male gaze has traditionally determined how the female is portrayed. Male artists have long painted the female form for a male audience, therefore assuming control of how the woman is depicted. Contemporary female artists have broken the passive mold once associated with representations of women by seizing control of the gaze. These emerging artists focus on the portrayal of the female in a multitude of incarnations.

Kimberly Brooks previews a painting from her new portrait series, depicting celebrated fashion stylists in her signature saturated Hockney-inspired style. Susan Anderson spent over two years traveling the country to photograph child beauty pageant contestants in extravagant costumes and poses. The result is the portrayal of very young girls looking back at the viewer with a bold gaze one would expect to see from a mature woman. Alika Cooper approaches portraits as though they were landscapes. Her quick and instinctive hand is visible in her work, capturing emotion and narrative with just a few sparse lines.

Photographers Danielle Mourning and Roya Falahi turn the gaze onto themselves through self-portraiture. In her new series, Falahi intertwines her Iranian heritage with her love of American punk rock by photographing herself wearing a rousari, a traditional Iranian headscarf,that she has meticulously covered in silver studs. Falahi re-appropriates symbols traditionally associated with imposed submission and rebelliousness, respectively, and imbues them with new meaning, reflecting the artist’s complex and multicultural identity. Meanwhile, Mourning’s reflexive work looks more to poetry than prose. Her ethereal photographs revisit her early childhood in the Northern California, fulfilling her objective to imagine history as it once was and question how it is fixed within the present.

Yasmine Mohseni is a Los Angeles-based arts writer and independent curator. Her articles have been published in Beautiful/Decay, BlackBook, Canvas, ForYourArt.com, Newsweek, and Whitewall. She covers contemporary art and culture for magazines, with an emphasis on contemporary Middle Eastern art. Past curatorial projects include exhibitions at the Tarryn Teresa Gallery and POVevolving in Los Angeles.

AQUA ART MIAMI 2009

AQUA ART MIAMI – WYNWOOD 2009

KIMBERLY BROOKS
KYLE FIELD
CHARLENE LIU
CHRIS NATROP
CLAIRE OSWALT
JEANA SOHN
FROHAWK TWO FEATHERS

Taylor De Cordoba – Booth # 29

December 3 – 6, 2009.
42 NE 25th St.
Miami FL 33137 (at N Miami Ave)
Aqua Art Miami

If you are planning to attend the fair, please contact the gallery for a limited supply of complimentary passes.

Image Details: Kimberly Brooks, “The Stylist Project”, Grace Coddington, Study, 2009, oil on linen, 16″ x 12″ ; Chris Natrop, Gleaming Without Us – Moss, 2008, ultrachrome print and machined cast acrylic, 23”x31”x1 1/8”

CHARLENE LIU: If It Were a Slow Echo


Charlene Liu: If It Were A Slow Echo
November 7 – December 19, 2009

Opening Reception: Saturday November 7, 6-8PM

Taylor De Cordoba is proud to present If It Were A Slow Echo, the gallery’s second exhibition of works on paper by Charlene Liu. The exhibition will run from November 7 – December 19, 2009 with an opening reception for the artist on Saturday, November 7th from 6 – 8PM.

In her new works on paper, Charlene Liu continues her interest in the natural landscape, abstracting directly from overlooked and diminutive moments of growth and decay. Many of the works allude to the vanitas of Dutch and Renaissance still-life paintings. The show’s title, If It Were a Slow Echo, recalls the transitory moments of sensory experience and the repetition of motifs that slowly weaves together patterns, lines, and color to the brink of chaotic excess. Combining collaged prints and traditional painting techniques, Liu layers, stains, and composes her paintings; interminably dissolving the transition between figure and ground. It’s an unpredictable and slow reveal with the effect of a quiet, amnesiac sense of disorientation.

In this way Liu’s work rocks back and forth between stasis and activity, order and entropy, becoming and receding. Her color palette operates similarly; in several works on paper, a subdued pastel palette resembles the color of an injury – a bruise or an infection, more than the onslaught of spring. Polka dotted hole punches appear as barnacles or parasites, traversing the picture plane at an exponential rate, bubbling and swelling in tandem with twisted brambles.

Born in Taiwan in 1975, Liu earned her MFA at Columbia University in 2003. Solo exhibitions of her work have been held at Shaheen Modern and Contemporary Art in Cleveland (2008), Taylor De Cordoba in Los Angeles (2007 and 2009), Virgil de Voldère in New York (2006), and Andrea Rosen Gallery, also in New York (2003). Liu is an assistant Professor at the University of Oregon, Eugene.

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